Eat Fit – Food First Aid (Part 2)

- Give Up Coffee For Beautiful Breasts
- Welcome to your First Trimester
- Welcome to your Second Trimester
- Welcome to your Third Trimester

"Cramp!”

Calcium is one of the main nutrients that prevent cramps, as it plays a direct role in muscular contractions. Mix your pre-workout shake with milk.

Description: Calcium is one of the main nutrients that prevent cramps, as it plays a direct role in muscular contractions. Mix your pre-workout shake with milk.

Calcium is one of the main nutrients that prevent cramps, as it plays a direct role in muscular contractions. Mix your pre-workout shake with milk.

Sodium plays a key role in water retention, as well as muscle function. Rather than snorting lines of table salt, try a sports drink.

Also drink plenty of water - a dehydrated muscle is more prone to cramp.

Potassium is another electrolyte that's lost when you sweat and a deficiency can be a major factor in susceptibility to muscle cramps. Keep your levels up by eating potassium-rich foods like sweet potato and banana.

 

 “I’m still sore. Should I train?”

 If you’re sore then you should definitely still train. Several studies have shown that moderate-intensity exercise can ease delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Going for a quick run or a blast on the exercise bike will get blood to the affected areas, helping them recover faster.

And if you want to avoid the feeling in future, do your preparation.

“Foam rolling and dynamic stretching before training, plus static stretching after training, are all very important,’ says personal trainer Tom Eastham. “Eating enough protein and carbohydrates before and after training will also improve your recovery, while taking BCAAs during training can help to keep the muscles fuelled" Try the “super-shake”: mix almond milk, protein powder, a handful of berries and some flaxseeds in a blender and drink the whole thing before or after training.

And remember, there’s one other fluid that’s effective and highly convenient. “Drinking enough water is the simplest and best way to avoid cramping and dehydration,” says Eastham. Weigh yourself before and after training, and drink enough water to make up for every gram you’ve lost.

Description:  “Drinking enough water is the simplest and best way to avoid cramping and dehydration,” says Eastham.

“Drinking enough water is the simplest and best way to avoid cramping and dehydration,” says Eastham.

You can also try eating blueberries before your next workout to avoid the problem in future: Kiwi research from the New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research and the Massey University School of Sport and Exercise found that the anthocyanins in blueberries (the pigment that gives them their colour) may help hasten the recovery of muscles after training, and ward off muscle fatigue by mopping up the additional free radicals that muscles produce during exercise.

You might also want to try some cherries: research in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that cherries contain anthocyanins and other compounds that naturally mediate the inflammatory process, meaning cherries - as well as grapes, pomegranates, acai berries, blueberries and cranberries -may help prevent the symptoms of muscle damage, such as soreness.

 
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