Things You Should Know When Feeding Children On Cheese

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Cheese is rich in nutrients, but not an easy food that can be eaten anytime without concerning the amount absorbed. The following information will help you provide children with the best nutritional diet.

Cheese’s nutritional value

There’re many people thinking that milk is essential to children, so when their children choose cheese only, they start concerning about the fact that their children could get overweight and have weaker physical state than other same-age one. Both milk and cheese are rich in nutrients including protein, sugary lipid, vitamins and minerals.

Description: Cheese is a concentrated state of milk, so in a small content of cheese, there’s a better amount of protein, fat, calcium than in milk.

Cheese is a concentrated state of milk, so in a small content of cheese, there’s a better amount of protein, fat, calcium than in milk.

In fact, cheese has milk origin. It’s a concentrated state of milk, so in a small content of cheese, there’s a better amount of protein, fat, calcium than in milk. In the comparison to normal milk, cheese doesn’t contain sugar, which makes it an ideal replacement to children who are unable to consume the lactose in milk. Moreover, cheese has casein as a main component. The casein is a type of protein which supports children’s digestion.       

The level of calcium in cheese is 6 times as high as it is in milk. Cheese also has vitamin D, which enable them to make a good job in helping bones absorb calcium. Besides, cheese is good for teeth health as it creates alkaline matters which help decrease the level of acid in the mouth and prevent dental caries.

Therefore, if children don’t want to have milk but do like cheese, you can let them eat cheese instead. Having about 60g cheese a day will help you meet the needs of nutrients that 400ml of milk does.

You can make reference to the following nutritional indexes:

The following indexes refer the nutritional value in 15g cheese and 100ml milk, respectively:

·         Energy (Kcal): 57, 74

·         Protein (g): 3.3, 3.9

·         Fat (g): 4.6, 4.4

·         Calcium (mg): 114, 120

Nonetheless, cheese has a great amount of cholesterol which is not good for human health. Cheese also has a low content of iron. For that reason, letting children eat cheese daily is not a thing to do.

Create a balance in providing children with cheese

Description: To make the best of cheese, you should only have it in light meals or combine it with foods.

To make the best of cheese, you should only have it in light meals or combine it with foods.

That children are obese is due to an insensible diet. Having cheese makes children overweight in case it’s used in a wrong way. Children may feel unwilling having a glass of milk, but make no resistance in eating some pieces of cheese; therefore, you should be careful not giving children too much cheese.

To make the best of cheese, you should only have it in light meals or combine it with foods like: bread, formula weaning foods or porridge... If you decide to do so, you should lessen the amount of meat, fish, oil and fat in the ration in order to prevent nutrient remains.

The appropriate amount of cheese for children at ages:

Normal cheese:

·         7-8 months old: 12-14g/time

·         9-11 months old: 14g/time

·         12-18 months old: 14-17/time

Fresh creamy cheese:

·         5-6 months old: 13g/time

·         7-8 months old: 20-24g/time  

·         9-11 months old: 24g/time

·         12-18 months old: 24-29g/time

Time to feed children on cheese

Description: Nutrition doctor recommend letting children eat cheese since they start weaning.

Nutrition doctor recommend letting children eat cheese since they start weaning.

Nutrition doctor recommend letting children eat cheese since they start weaning. (about 6 months old), but let them start with a little amount and increase it gradually. You also have to look for signs of diseases when your children eat cheese and ask doctor when finding something. You should choose cheese dedicated for children under 1 year old which has the content of fat under 20%.

Ways to feed children on cheese

·         Cheese is often used as instant food (like cakes) or should be ground well and eaten with sandwich (ration for children who are over 1 year old.

·         You can blend cheese with fruits (mango, banana, avocado…).

·         Blend cheese with warm water; make cheese a paste mixture.

·         Cheese can be combined with formula weaning food or porridge.

·         Cheese with porridge: Cook the porridge till it’s done. Wait till the porridge cooling down to 80 degrees Celsius then put the cheese in. This is the best way to keep the cheese stay nutritious and avoid metabolisms. 

·         You can also cook cheese with rice flour or spaghetti (powder cheese and sprinkle it on the rice porridge.

·         Blend cheese with tofu.

·         When cooking cheese with porridge or formula weaning foods, the other ingredients should go well with cheese, such as potato, carrot, beef, chicken and shrimp. Do not cook cheese with craps, eels, creeping spinach, Chinese spinach.

 
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